Find Flu Clinics Near You
Zip Code
Eat Safe! Check the peanut Recall List. www.fda.gov or 1-800-CDC-INFO
Prevent Lead Poisoning Button
 
SJCPHS HIV Testing

Mission:

Public Health Services, in partnership with the community, promotes a healthy future for San Joaquin County.

Public Health Highlights:

Vaccine Information for ParentsBlack Infant Health Program:10 Free Prenatal Sessions Starting April 14 - Register Now
Free Classes on Eating Smart and Being ActiveReach, Treat, Cure TB
West Nile VirusWhat You Need to Know Now - Facts About Ebola
Public Health Services Clinics' Locations and SchedulesObesity Prevention in San Joaquin County
Community Health Status ReportMedical Marijuana Identification Card Program
Vaccine Information for Parents
Most parents today have never seen first-hand the devastating consequences that vaccine-preventable diseases can have on a child, a family, or community. Thanks to vaccines, many of these diseases are not common in the U.S., but they persist around the world.  Immunizations are still the best way to protect children from 14 vaccine-preventable diseases.  
CDC recently launched a new website designed with input from parents of babies and toddlers. This site features easy-to-find vaccine information, including:Personal stories of vaccine preventable diseases can be found on the website: http://shotbyshot.org/

Black Infant Health Program:10 Free Prenatal Sessions Starting April 14 - Register Now

Black babies die at more than three times the rate of other babies in all populations in the first year of life. They die because they are born too soon and too small. The mission of the Public Health Services Black Infant Health (BIH) program is to close the gap in infant mortality by helping women in the program have a healthy pregnancy. BIH empowers women to make healthy life choices for themselves and their families. We build on the strengths of our clients, we honor our unique history and traditions as people of African descent and we include information important to African American women.

To enroll in the BIH program women must be 18 years or older, 26 weeks or less pregnant, and identify as African American. Starting April 14, the program is offering a new series of 10 Free Prenatal Sessions. All classes are held from 11:30 am - 2:00 pm, at the Health Net of California Community Solutions Center, 678 N. Wilson Way in Stockton. Registration is required for these free classes. For more information and to register, call 209-468-3004.

Free Classes on Eating Smart and Being Active

Public Health Services is offering FREE classes that focus on improving nutrition and physical activity. The classes are open to all. No registration is required and drop-ins are welcome at any of the 7 classes. Classes will be on Tuesdays in April and May, from 5:30-6:30pm at Stribley Park Community Center, 1760 E. Sonora Street in Stockton. To see the full schedule and variety of topics, click here.

For more information, contact Tara Lew at 209-468-3821 or tlew@sjcphs.org.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics encourages everyone to "Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle". Consuming fewer calories, making informed food choices, and getting daily exercise are key factors to maintaining a healthy weight, reducing your risk of chronic disease and promoting your overall health. Learn more by visiting, www.eatright.org.

Additional Resources:

NEOP-Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Program - Eat Smart, Move More
 15 Healthy Tips

Reach, Treat, Cure TB

Although Tuberculosis (TB) is curable, it remains one of the world's greatest health challenges. More than 2 billion people, equal to a quarter of the world's population, are infected with TB.

Every year, nine million people get sick with TB, but a third of them do not get the TB services that they need. Many of these three million people live in the world's poorest and most vulnerable communities.

No one should be left behind in the fight against TB. Officials call for a global effort to find, treat and cure the three million and accelerate progress towards zero TB deaths, infections, suffering and stigma.

The San Joaquin County Public Health Services Tuberculosis and Communicable Disease Control Program provides: surveillance/reporting of disease; TB case management services for suspected and diagnosed cases; contact identification, assessment, referral & monitoring; Directly Observed Therapy (DOT); consultation for health care providers, hospital infection control practitioners and school nurses; outbreak control activities; and community education. For information on tuberculosis and screening in San Joaquin County, call 209-468-3822, weekdays 8am-5pm.

Find out more about the incredible statistics and global impact of TB, as well as what you can do to help "Stop TB" by reading:

PDF fileStop TB General Infographic.pdf
PDF fileStop TB Impact Infographic.pdf
West Nile Virus

West  Nile Virus is a seasonal health riskfight the bite in California and San Joaquin  County.  Transmitted to humans by mosquito bite, the risk season  generally runs from May through October.  To find out more about how  you can dead birdprevent West Nile Virus infection, please use this link: More  Info (Informacion Sobre el Virus del Nilo  Occidental)

                        

Additional Resources: State of California Site for West Nile, Vector Control

What You Need to Know Now - Facts About Ebola

At a time when Ebola is all over the news, we want to make sure you have the clear-cut facts about Ebola. Get informed and share this information with your friends and family to make sure they know the facts about Ebola, click here for a downloadable flyer. More detailed information on Ebola may be found at sjcphs.org/emprep/EPEbola.aspx . The basic facts everyone needs to know about Ebola include:

  1. Ebola is NOT spread through casual contact, air, water, or food grown or legally purchased in the United States.
  2. Ebola is transmitted through direct contact with bodily fluids of someone who is already showing symptoms of the disease.
  3. The symptoms of Ebola include: fever, headache, joint and muscle aches, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, lack of appetite, and abnormal bleeding. Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to Ebola virus, though 8-10 days is most common.
  4. If a person does not have symptoms, they are not contagious. In order for the virus to be transmitted, an individual would have to have direct contact with an individual who is experiencing symptoms or has died of the disease.

Everyone is encouraged to keep informed by visiting official public health websites for timely and accurate information, such as:

Public Health Services Clinics' Locations and Schedules
For clinic locations and hours, please click here.
Obesity Prevention in San Joaquin County
Sick Little boy

Is there a quick answer to the question, "what contributes to overweight and obesity?"

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, there are a variety of factors that play a role in obesity. This makes it a complex health issue to address. Individual behavior, the physical environment, and genetic factors may all have an effect in causing people to be overweight and obese.

Body Mass Index (BMI) is the most widely used measurement for obesity. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a number calculated from a person's weight and height, and is a fairly reliable indicator of body fatness for most people.  To calculate your BMI, and for more information, click here.

Additional Resources:
  • For more information about causes of obesity and how to prevent/control it, click here.

Community Health Status Report

The report below examines data for various health indicators and provides discussion on the data and trends that are of particular significance for San Joaquin County Residents:

Medical Marijuana Identification Card Program

Image of Medical Marijuana ID CardThe Medical Marijuana Program (MMP) was established to provide a voluntary medical marijuana identification card issuance and registry program for qualified patients and their caregivers.

Tips 4 Mom and Mom 2B